Follow

Apropos what @WizardOfDocs just posted: ξένος, as an adjective in Hellenic Greek, meant "foreign" or "strange, unusual". It's where we get the English prefix "xeno-".

But as a noun, ξένος had a remarkably different meaning: it meant "guest" or "host", in the sense of "one receiving/presenting hospitality". Prof. Heiny, my Classical Studies teacher, liked to translate it as "guest-friend"; your ξένος was someone whom you could rely upon to provide hospitality, and to whom you were obliged to provide hospitality in return.

· · Web · 1 · 1 · 3

(Yes, ξένος also meant "stranger", "foreigner", or - heh - "hired help, mercenary", but "guest-friend" was its primary meaning.)

Sign in to participate in the conversation
Elekk: Gameing and Other Delightful Pursuits

The social network of the future: No ads, no corporate surveillance, ethical design, and decentralization! Own your data with Mastodon!