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The Well-Tempered Synthesizer by Wendy Carlos turns 50 years old this month. After demonstrating that synthesizers were Musical As Fuck with Switched-On Bach, her second album goes a step further, capturing the nuances of Handel and Scarlatti, and even having an admirable shot at vocal synthesis. Give it a listen!

For whatever reason, Wendy's entire back catalogue outside the Tron OST remains tragically unavailiable, but Archive Dot Org has us covered.

archive.org/details/WendyCarlo

@ThreeLetterMax Her stuff is also floating around Torrent, natch. Pirate bay I think.

@Shufei Yeah. I once found her extended Clockwork Orange CD in Fopp years ago, but everything else I've only been able to find on soulseek. Charity shops with a decent vinyl selection aren't a bad place to go hunting though.

@ThreeLetterMax thank you so much for pointing out this is on archive.org, i've been trying to find a copy of that collab she did with weird al _forever_

@wijn right?! One of the most important figures in electronic music history and her entire catalogue is an absolute bastard to find. It's a real shame.

@ThreeLetterMax yup. the only thing I had of hers was a vinyl copy of Switched-On Bach I just randomly found in a junk store one day.

@wijn nice. Was it the terrible cursed version of the album cover where the Bach model is sat down, making a silly face and wearing a pair of headphones plugged into the INPUT of a random module? Because if I can ever find a vinyl copy that's the one I would go for.

@wijn Oooh, a copy for radio stations? Don't think I've seen a variant like that before. Dang, how many different versions of this one album ARE there out there?

@ThreeLetterMax It's a sticker on the front, but it's always neat to find these sort of variations when grabbing records. also i wonder what sort of radio station would have even played this.

@wijn Yeah, it's a stubbornly difficult record to categorise. It wouldn't fit on a pop station, it made classical stations pretty cross at the time, and don't you fucking dare call it a novelty record, although there were certainly no shortage of Bad Novelty Records that ripped it off.

There's a great radio programme from 1969 by Glenn Gould, featuring interviews with Wendy Carlos and Jean Le Moyne, that seems to nicely capture what The Discourse at the time was like.

youtu.be/vtQ_6r8EvUw

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